© Adûnâi
youtube.com/watch?v=zzquJqZyL6k&lc=UgzCHlbJ_1m5S9s5W4F4AaABAg

This is the unity of memes and genes! When culture is put to serve the interests of the people! What other nation enjoys such great celebration of their achievement and glory?

– Adûnâi

© Владислав Лазерев
youtube.com/watch?v=zzquJqZyL6k&lc=UgzoV1YlAkzWkmO25Rx4AaABAg

In some ways, with us just having seen the 75th anniversary of the end and victory of another of the world’s most devastating wars, and some worrying provocations and even gunfire along the DMZ, likely coming as a result of the south’s joint military exercises, a very “mucky” situation that very strongly resembles the start of the war referred to in the video, perhaps now is an even better time to watch this concert than 7.27 itself…

This concert, though some may be confused by a lot of militaristic imagery, contains a very expressive selection of music with each song effectively portraying diverse emotions throughout the war period. From the frightening outset of war (Kim Il Sung’s speech telling of the start of the war) and the harsh and terrifying reality of the frontline (Mungyong Pass) to the longing of the wives and children of soldiers (Song of blessing; At the spring site), an eternal thankfulness for the deeds of all the soldiers (Tell, fireworks of War victory) and finally a great celebration at its end. The Moranbong girls have shown their thanks in the most beautiful way possible.

The audience in this concert may seem a little tired to some, but we can see some very prominent figures, I’m not sure anyone has noticed Hyon Song-wol at 15:28 on the far right, who is actually dressed in a Moranbong Band uniform, which I find quite interesting, considering we have only seen her dressed in Moranbong uniform in one group photo with Marshal Kim Jong Un and Ri Sol-ju.

Also rather interesting (to me) about the banquet is the bread on the tables, which appears to be of a savory kind. In China, western-style savory bread as we know it appears to be not commercially available at all, the only bread you can eat is really sweet. I would’ve thought the same would’ve applied in the DPRK. I don’t know if this was just the area of China I went to or not but if you’ve been to DPR Korea before, could you answer my bizarre question about the bread there?

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